Sociology (SOC)

SOC 199, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 204, *INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY, 3 Credits

Development and application of sociological concepts and perspectives concerning human groups; includes attention to socialization, culture, organization, stratification, and societies. Consideration of fundamental concepts and research methodology. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Equivalent to: SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 205, *INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIAL CHANGE, 3 Credits

Sociological study of the dynamic organizational nature of society through analysis of social change and major social institutions such as family, education, religion, the economy, and political systems. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Available via Ecampus

SOC 206, *SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND ISSUES, 3 Credits

Examination of social problems with particular focus upon U.S. society. Sociological perspectives on definition, description, and analysis of contemporary and recurrent problems in industrialized societies. Investigation of causes and consequences of social problems considered in societal context. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Available via Ecampus

SOC 241, INTRODUCTION TO CRIME AND JUSTICE, 3 Credits

Provides a sociological understanding of criminal justice system institutions and processes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the criminal law; police and policing; courts and the prosecution process; and prisons, jails and corrections.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 242, CRIME AND MEDIA, 3 Credits

Provides a better understanding of how the media constructs perceptions and stereotypes of crime and the criminal justice system. Emphasizes on contemporary crime topics by examining current news outlets, crime TV shows, movies, and podcasts. Provide the tools necessary to decipher fact from fiction in the media representation of crime and the criminal justice system.

Recommended: SOC 204

SOC 299, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Equivalent to: SOC 299H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 312, *SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY, 4 Credits

Survey of the family as a social institution. Addresses historical and cultural perspectives with emphasis on family diversity, variations in family form and life style, interdependence between family and other institutions, analysis of major family issues, forces for change in the family. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Equivalent to: SOC 312H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 312H, *SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY, 4 Credits

Survey of the family as a social institution. Addresses historical and cultural perspectives with emphasis on family diversity, variations in family form and life style, interdependence between family and other institutions, analysis of major family issues, forces for change in the family. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: SOC 312

SOC 313, SOCIOLOGY OF INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS, 4 Credits

Examines the microsociological dynamics of intimate relationships. Perceptions and expectations of intimate relationships are explored. Specific attention will be given to issues, processes, and factors that are involved in the construction and management of intimate relationships in contemporary society.

SOC 315, ^METHODS I: RESEARCH DESIGN, 4 Credits

First in a two-course sequence required of all sociology majors. Students learn to formulate researchable questions, devise measures, select data collection techniques, and examine ethical and practical dilemmas in constructing sociological research. (Writing Intensive Course)

Attributes: CWIC – Core, Skills, WIC

Equivalent to: SOC 415

Available via Ecampus

SOC 316, METHODS II: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS, 4 Credits

Second in a two-course sequence required of all sociology majors. The primary objective is to provide students with the statistical skills necessary to analyze sociological data. Covers the construction and interpretation of contingency tables, basic ideas of probability and statistical inference, and an introduction to correlation and regression.

Prerequisite: SOC 315 with C- or better

Equivalent to: SOC 416

Available via Ecampus

SOC 340, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL CONTROL, 4 Credits

Current perspectives, research and theories of deviant behavior. Review and analysis of various approaches and programs designed to prevent and deal with deviant behavior.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 341, POLICE AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Represents a social scientific examination of the field of policing rather than methods or tactics of crime control. Explores the culture of law enforcement and how police officers perform their duties and create their own impressions of their work. Examines how the field of law enforcement is influenced by historical trends, laws, cultural & occupational values, and social institutions. Discusses stereotypes, routine duties, occupational stressors, and deadly hazards of law enforcement which provide opportunities to practice and improve interpersonal and conflict resolution skills.

Recommended: SOC 204 and/or SOC 241

SOC 345, *CRIMES AND VIOLENCE IN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS, 4 Credits

Analyzes the historical, social, political, legal, cultural, and psychological aspects of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Addresses definitions of the problem, demographics, survivors, perpetrators, witnesses, bystanders, strategies and tactics of abusers and survivors, along with strategies for prevention, intervention, treatment, and social change. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Available via Ecampus

SOC 349, SERIAL HOMICIDE, 4 Credits

Examines the extent, causes, and social characteristics of serial killers. After examining general criminological theories and the characteristics of “typical murder,” investigates the popular images about serial killers, the motivations of these offenders, the distribution of their crimes over time and across geographical areas, elements surrounding these offenses, and the offenders' methods of selecting victims. Topics include homicide investigation techniques, crime profiling, and the criminal prosecution of serial killers.

Recommended: SOC 204 and/or SOC 241

SOC 350, HEALTH, ILLNESS AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Social and cultural factors in the identification, course, and treatment of illness; analysis of selected health settings and professions.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 351, *SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL ILLNESS, 4 Credits

Focuses on how social and cultural context impact mental health, and how the very concepts of mental illness, abnormal or crazy are constructed in the first place, then applied by both “mental health” professionals and persons in their everyday lives. Examines major social models of “mental illness,” aiming to understand and evaluate their basic concepts and assumptions, as well as the response to “mental illness,” including how family, friends, troubled persons and professionals interpret, define and respond to “mental illness” and the processes shaping the policies and practices of the mental health enterprise.

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Available via Ecampus

SOC 355, DEATH AND DYING, 4 Credits

An overview of cross-cultural and historical attitudes and practices around end of life, death and dying. Assessment of contemporary legal, professional, cultural and technological issues surrounding end of life/death and dying.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 360, *POPULATION TRENDS AND POLICY, 4 Credits

Basic socio-demographic factors affecting population size, distribution, composition and change; examination of local, national, and international trends, and demographic policy. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Available via Ecampus

SOC 371, *SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVERYDAY LIFE, 4 Credits

Examines key concepts, themes, and theories in the study of social media in today's world. Interconnected themes include communication and the public sphere, self representation, power, and new technologies. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

Available via Ecampus

SOC 372, *POPULAR CULTURE, 4 Credits

Critical examination of contemporary popular culture from a sociological perspective. Debates in the field of cultural sociology, including a critique of the distinction between 'high' and 'low' forms of culture, the social distinction between work and leisure time, the influence of society on individual patterns of consumption and personal taste, and the sociology of everyday life. Specific topics include mass media, sports, leisure activities, fashion, youth culture, science fiction, music, talk shows, soap operas, internet chat rooms, personal ads, home shopping, and folklore.

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Available via Ecampus

SOC 381, SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF SUSTAINABILITY, 4 Credits

Exploration of the social forces driving current views of sustainability. Specific attention will be given to values and belief systems, as well as social institutions in shaping sustainability issues related to ecologically sound, socially just, and economically viable outcomes.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 399, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Selected topics of special or current interest not covered in other courses.

Equivalent to: SOC 399H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 399H, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Selected topics of special or current interest not covered in other courses.

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: SOC 399

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 401, RESEARCH, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 403, THESIS, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 405, READING AND CONFERENCE, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 406, PROJECTS, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 407, SEMINAR, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 410, INTERNSHIP, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 30 credits.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 412, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK AND FAMILY, 4 Credits

Survey of the intersections between families and work; variations in family structure, policies and paid and unpaid work in the United States; interdependence between paid and unpaid family labor and broader social change.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 413, SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY, 4 Credits

Historical and philosophical foundations of sociological theory; major schools of thought and their major contributors.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 418, QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS, 4 Credits

An introduction to the theory and methods of qualitative research. Students will be exposed to various qualitative research methods through practical field exercises. These include ethnographic field observation, content analysis, interviewing, focus groups and unobtrusive measures. Other commonly used methods of collecting qualitative data are also examined.

SOC 422, SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS, 4 Credits

Introduces sociological thinking about organizations in contemporary society with an emphasis on exploring the range of frameworks used to think about and explain modern organizations; applies knowledge to specific contemporary organizations.

SOC 424, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 4 Credits

Examines individuals in social context; explores dynamics of interpersonal relationships; evaluates link between self and society, including concepts of role/status/identity. Contemporary research design, problems, and findings pertinent to social psychology.

SOC 426, *SOCIAL INEQUALITY, 4 Credits

Evolution of social inequality in society. Emphasis upon the causes and consequences of inequality in power, privilege, and prestige in human societies, with special attention to the United States. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Available via Ecampus

SOC 430, GENDER AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Examination of nature and consequences of social differentiation and stratification on the basis of sex and gender. Analysis of social position of women and men in society, focusing on their positions in institutional areas such as the family, politics, work and education. Evaluation of theories of biological, psychological, and sociological bases for the behavior and characteristics of women and men.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 432, SOCIOLOGY OF AGING, 4 Credits

Examination of the social significance of age, position and problems of the elderly in society; discusses the societal and individual consequences of an aging population; explores social theories of aging.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 437, RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS, 4 Credits

Comparative/international perspective on the social construction of race and ethnicity. Social, economic and political experiences of selected groups in the U.S. and other countries are examined.

SOC 438, US IMMIGRATION ISSUES IN THE 21ST CENTURY, 4 Credits

Provides a critical overview of immigration to the United States from a socio-historic perspective. Examines how successive waves of immigrants have influenced American society from the earliest groups of Europeans in the 19th century to the most recently arriving immigrants from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

SOC 439, WELFARE AND SOCIAL SERVICES, 4 Credits

Analysis of social, political, and economic forces affecting welfare and social service systems, with overview of current programs, policy issues, public opinions, occupational aspects and societal impacts.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 440, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY, 4 Credits

Contemporary research and theories of juvenile delinquency. Review and evaluation of various strategies and programs designed to prevent delinquency or for treatment of delinquents.

SOC 441, CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY, 4 Credits

Review of sociological perspectives on crime and criminal justice, with emphasis upon North America. Review of crime statistics, types of crime, theories of criminality, corrections programs and prisons, and programs to reduce crime.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 442, SOCIOLOGY OF DRUG USE AND ABUSE, 4 Credits

Emphasizes a sociological understanding of drug use, drug problems and drug policy. In order to understand drug use and abuse it is necessary to understand the chemical properties of the substances at issue, the attributes of the people who use and abuse drugs, and the norms and characteristics of the society in which the substance use occurs.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 444, INSIDE-OUT: PRISONS, COMMUNITIES, AND PREVENTION, 4 Credits

Course takes place in a state correctional facility, with OSU students learning alongside "inside" students from the facility for a full quarter. Course content examines prisons, communities, crime, and prevention from a sociological perspective. All students participate in service-learning projects.

Equivalent to: SOC 444H

SOC 444H, INSIDE-OUT: PRISONS, COMMUNITIES, AND PREVENTION, 4 Credits

Course takes place in a state correctional facility, with OSU students learning alongside "inside" students from the facility for a full quarter. Course content examines prisons, communities, crime, and prevention from a sociological perspective. All students participate in service-learning projects.

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: SOC 444

SOC 448, LAW AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

An introduction to social scientific approaches to law, covering major topics in the area. Topics may include disputing, legal consciousness, social movements and law, punishment, legal actors, and legal institutions.

Recommended: (SOC 204 or SOC 204H) with minimum grade of D-

SOC 449, LAW, CRIME, AND POLICY, 4 Credits

Surveys criminal justice policies aimed at enforcing laws, reducing crime, punishing violators, and rehabilitating ex-offenders. Interrogates the behavioral assumptions used in creating and evaluating policies. Examines specific crimes and the policies used to address them.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 450, SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION, 4 Credits

Contemporary perspectives and research on schools, students, teachers and social forces affecting the educational system. Review of comparative and evaluation research on alternative educational strategies and programs. Overview of the literature of educational critics.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 452, SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION, 4 Credits

Social patterns within U.S. religious groups, relation of religious groups to society, and the methodological problems in studying such groups.

SOC 453, SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT, 4 Credits

Critical analysis of sport. Examines sport socialization; deviance; violence; gender; race/ethnicity; professional sport careers; intercollegiate athletics; marriage/family; and the media.

SOC 454, LEISURE AND CULTURE, 4 Credits

Examination of the social, cultural, and global significance of leisure activity (in particular, tourism and recreation) from a historical perspective relative to attitudes, values, behaviors, and use of natural resources. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Available via Ecampus

SOC 456, *SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIAL CONTEXT, 4 Credits

Study of social aspects of science and technology (values, practices, organization, impacts) by analysis of issues revealing their relationship to other social and cultural processes. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

SOC 460, THE SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION, 4 Credits

Examines the sociological effect of globalization on Western and non-Western societies. The course focuses on changes in the global economy and how this has influenced the social structure, patterns of change, and mutual influences among societies. (NC)

Attributes: LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

SOC 466, INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: GENDER ISSUES, 4 Credits

Examines roles and statuses of women and men throughout the world and differential impact of development on men and women. Evaluates traditional development policies and programs and discusses theories of gender stratification and of modernization. (NC)

Attributes: LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

SOC 470, COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR, 4 Credits

Examines current theories; focuses on behavior in crowds and diverse social settings including fads/fashions, ecstatic crowds/miracles, natural/technological disasters, urban legends, collective delusions/mass hysteria, protest/demonstrations, riots/mobs.

SOC 471, *SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, 4 Credits

Introduces core theoretical and methodological issues related to social movements in the US and abroad. Emphasizes social forces giving rise to movements, tactics employed by movements, and impacts of them on society.

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst

Available via Ecampus

SOC 475, RURAL SOCIOLOGY, 4 Credits

Helps students understand the rich diversity in rural society, with an emphasis on the interdependencies between urban and rural contexts. Current issues and social problems experienced by rural populations and how sociology is used to understand and address issues affecting rural communities are explored.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 480, ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY, 4 Credits

Explores the evolution of environmental thought, paradigm shifts, and institutional structures associated with environmental concerns, social movements, and social impacts.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 481, *SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, 4 Credits

Explores the complex interrelationships between humans and natural resources, emphasizing how management decisions and organizations are enmeshed in social and cultural contexts. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

Available via Ecampus

SOC 482, *ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Explores the complex interrelationships between humans and energy, emphasizing the role of energy in critical social issues, including but not limited to: domestic and international conflict, poverty, social change, inter-generational equity, energy transitions and environmental justice. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

SOC 499, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Selected topics of special or current interest not covered in other courses. For advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Equivalent to: SOC 490, SOC 499H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 499H, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Selected topics of special or current interest not covered in other courses. For advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: SOC 499

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 501, RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 502, INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 503, THESIS, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 999 credits.

SOC 505, READING AND CONFERENCE, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 506, PROJECTS, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 507, SEMINAR, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 508, WORKSHOP, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 510, INTERNSHIP, 1-16 Credits

Graded P/N.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

SOC 512, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK AND FAMILY, 4 Credits

Survey of the intersections between families and work; variations in family structure, policies and paid and unpaid work in the United States; interdependence between paid and unpaid family labor and broader social change.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 513, SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY, 4 Credits

Historical and philosophical foundations of sociological theory; major school of thought and their major contributors.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 518, QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS, 4 Credits

An introduction to the theory and methods of qualitative research. Students will be exposed to various qualitative research methods through practical field exercises. These include ethnographic field observation, content analysis, interviewing, focus groups and unobtrusive measures. Other commonly used methods of collecting qualitative data are also examined.

Equivalent to: PPOL 523

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 522, SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS, 4 Credits

Introduces sociological thinking about organizations in contemporary society with an emphasis on exploring the range of frameworks used to think about and explain modern organizations; applies knowledge to specific contemporary organizations.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 524, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 4 Credits

Examines individuals in social context; explores dynamics of interpersonal relationships; evaluates link between self and society, including concepts of role/status/identity. Contemporary research design, problems, and findings pertinent to social psychology.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 526, SOCIAL INEQUALITY, 4 Credits

Evolution of social inequality in society. Emphasis upon the causes and consequences of inequality in power, privilege, and prestige in human societies, with special attention to the United States.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 530, GENDER AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Examination of nature and consequences of social differentiation and stratification on the basis of sex and gender. Analysis of social position of women and men in society, focusing on their positions in institutional areas such as the family, politics, work and education. Evaluation of theories of biological, psychological, and sociological bases for the behavior and characteristics of women and men.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 532, SOCIOLOGY OF AGING, 4 Credits

Examination of the social significance of age, position and problems of the elderly in society; discusses the societal and individual consequences of an aging population; explores social theories of aging.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 537, RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS, 4 Credits

Comparative/international perspective on the social construction of race and ethnicity. Social, economic and political experiences of selected groups in the U.S. and other countries are examined.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 538, US IMMIGRATION ISSUES IN THE 21ST CENTURY, 4 Credits

Provides a critical overview of immigration to the United States from a socio-historic perspective. Examines how successive waves of immigrants have influenced American society from the earliest groups of Europeans in the 19th century to the most recently arriving immigrants from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

SOC 539, WELFARE AND SOCIAL SERVICES, 4 Credits

Analysis of social, political, and economic forces affecting welfare and social service systems, with overview of current programs, policy issues, public opinions, occupational aspects and societal impacts.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H or SOC 205 or SOC 206

Available via Ecampus

SOC 540, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY, 4 Credits

Contemporary research and theories of juvenile delinquency. Review and evaluation of various strategies and programs designed to prevent delinquency or for treatment of delinquents.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 541, CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY, 4 Credits

Review of sociological perspectives on crime and criminal justice, with emphasis upon North America. Review of crime statistics, types of crime, theories of criminality, corrections programs and prisons, and programs to reduce crime.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 542, SOCIOLOGY OF DRUG USE AND ABUSE, 4 Credits

Emphasizes a sociological understanding of drug use, drug problems and drug policy. In order to understand drug use and abuse it is necessary to understand the chemical properties of the substances at issue, the attributes of the people who use and abuse drugs, and the norms and characteristics of the society in which the substance use occurs.

Available via Ecampus

SOC 544, INSIDE-OUT: PRISONS, COMMUNITIES, AND PREVENTION, 4 Credits

Course takes place in a state correctional facility, with OSU students learning alongside "inside" students from the facility for a full quarter. Course content examines prisons, communities, crime, and prevention from a sociological perspective. All students participate in service-learning projects.

Recommended: SOC 204

SOC 548, LAW AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

An introduction to social scientific approaches to law, covering major topics in the area. Topics may include disputing, legal consciousness, social movements and law, punishment, legal actors, and legal institutions.

Recommended: (SOC 204 or SOC 204H) with minimum grade of D-

SOC 549, LAW, CRIME, AND POLICY, 4 Credits

Surveys criminal justice policies aimed at enforcing laws, reducing crime, punishing violators, and rehabilitating ex-offenders. Interrogates the behavioral assumptions used in creating and evaluating policies. Examines specific crimes and the policies used to address them.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 550, SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION, 4 Credits

Contemporary perspectives and research on schools, students, teachers and social forces affecting the educational system. Review of comparative and evaluation research on alternative educational strategies and programs. Overview of the literature of educational critics.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 552, SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION, 4 Credits

Social patterns within U.S. religious groups, relation of religious groups to society, and the methodological problems in studying such groups.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 553, SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT, 4 Credits

Critical analysis of sport. Examines sport socialization; deviance; violence; gender; race/ethnicity; professional sport careers; intercollegiate athletics; marriage/family; and the media.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 554, LEISURE AND CULTURE, 4 Credits

Examination of the social, cultural, and global significance of leisure activity (in particular, tourism and recreation) from a historical perspective relative to attitudes, values, behaviors, and use of natural resources.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 556, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIAL CONTEXT, 4 Credits

Study of social aspects of science and technology (values, practices, organization, impacts) by analysis of issues revealing their relationship to other social and cultural processes.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 560, THE SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION, 4 Credits

Examines the sociological effect of globalization on Western and non-Western societies. The course focuses on changes in the global economy and how this has influenced the social structure, patterns of change, and mutual influences among societies.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 566, INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: GENDER ISSUES, 4 Credits

Examines roles and statuses of women and men throughout the world and differential impact of development on men and women. Evaluates traditional development policies and programs and discusses theories of gender stratification and of modernization.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 570, COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR, 4 Credits

Examines current theories; focuses on behavior in crowds and diverse social settings including fads/fashions, ecstatic crowds/miracles, natural/technological disasters, urban legends, collective delusions/mass hysteria, protest/demonstrations, riots/mobs.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 571, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, 4 Credits

Introduces core theoretical and methodological issues related to social movements in the US and abroad. Emphasizes social forces giving rise to movements, tactics employed by movements, and impacts of them on society.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 575, RURAL SOCIOLOGY, 4 Credits

Helps students understand the rich diversity in rural society, with an emphasis on the interdependencies between urban and rural contexts. Current issues and social problems experienced by rural populations and how sociology is used to understand and address issues affecting rural communities are explored.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 580, ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY, 4 Credits

Explores the evolution of environmental thought, paradigm shifts, and institutional structures associated with environmental concerns, social movements, and social impacts.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 581, SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, 4 Credits

Explores the complex interrelationships between humans and natural resources, emphasizing how management decisions and organizations are enmeshed in social and cultural contexts.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

Available via Ecampus

SOC 582, ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SOCIETY, 4 Credits

Explores the complex interrelationships between humans and energy, emphasizing the role of energy in critical social issues, including but not limited to: domestic and international conflict, poverty, social change, inter-generational equity, energy transitions and environmental justice.

SOC 599, SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-16 Credits

Selected topics of special or current interest not covered in other courses. For advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Equivalent to: SOC 590

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

Recommended: SOC 204 or SOC 204H

SOC 808, WORKSHOP, 1-16 Credits

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.