Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 101. *INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Located at the intersection of the humanities and the sciences, anthropology strives for a holistic understanding of the human condition. This course introduces students to the basic concepts, theories and methods of anthropology, including its four main sub-fields: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. The course is driven by fundamental questions, including: What is culture? How do anthropologists study human populations, both past and present? How can this field help us better understand contemporary human problems? (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst

ANTH 110. *INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Investigates cultural adaptation and change in different environmental and historical contexts. Compares the means by which cultures solve common human problems. Shows similarities and differences throughout the world in systems of values, family, religion, economics, and politics. Students are asked to consider future cultural conditions. Uses a video format. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ANTH 159. *LANGUAGE, RACE AND RACISM IN THE US: AN INTRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

Students in this course will unpack language, race and racism--as well as the intersections between those ideas-- as cornerstones to understanding identity and society as inherently socially constructed notions. (Bacc Core Course) CROSSLISTED as ES 159 and WLC 159.

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Equivalent to: ES 159, WLC 159

ANTH 199. SPECIAL STUDIES. (1-3 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 3 credits.

ANTH 208. *WESTERN CULTURE STUDY ABROAD. (3 Credits)

Overseas study of the history and contemporary form of important features of Western culture. Based on at least 10 weeks of studying abroad. CROSSLISTED as LING 208. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPWC – Core, Pers, West Culture

Equivalent to: LING 208

ANTH 209. *CULTURAL DIVERSITY STUDY ABROAD. (3 Credits)

Overseas study of non-Western cultures. Based on at least 10 weeks of studying abroad. CROSSLISTED as LING 209. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity

Equivalent to: LING 209

ANTH 210. *COMPARATIVE CULTURES. (3 Credits)

Compares the cultures originating in Asia, Africa, and precolonial Australia, Oceania, and North and South America. Introduces method and theory for comparative cultural analysis from historical, ethnographic, and indigenous viewpoints. Considers the contribution and influences of minority and ethnic groups on the mainstream culture in nation states. Summarizes the characteristics of cultures in the major world culture areas. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity

ANTH 230. TIME TRAVELERS. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the historical developments of modern archaeology. The often romanticized public image of archaeology will be contrasted with scientific reality. The nature of archaeological data, modern field methods, analytical techniques, and theoretical background will be reviewed in order to illustrate how the unwritten record of human cultural behavior is deciphered. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ANTH 240. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An investigation of the origin of modern people (Homo sapiens) in a historical context; review of key discoveries and current research on the relationships between humans and other primates; exploration of contrasting views of humanity. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ANTH 251. *LANGUAGE IN THE USA. (3 Credits)

Examines the linguistic aspects of ethnic, class, and gender differences in the United States of America, with a focus on language attitudes. Uses both oral and written materials and quantitative and qualitative approaches. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

Equivalent to: ANTH 251H

ANTH 251H. *LANGUAGE IN THE USA. (3 Credits)

Examines the linguistic aspects of ethnic, class, and gender differences in the United States of America, with a focus on language attitudes. Uses both oral and written materials and quantitative and qualitative approaches. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 251

ANTH 261. *FOOD IN AMERICAN CULTURE. (3 Credits)

Fosters understanding of the meanings of foods and foodways in American culture. Uses food as a lens to explore general topic areas such as work, family, ecology, and identity. Critically examines core issues that shape and have shaped American culture. (Bacc Core Course) (SS) CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 261.

Attributes: CPWC – Core, Pers, West Culture; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Equivalent to: FCSJ 261

ANTH 284. *PRIMATE ADAPTATION AND EVOLUTION. (4 Credits)

Introduces students to our closest living relatives, the primates. Uses theories and concepts from evolutionary biology to explore the diverse anatomical and behavioral adaptations of different primate species. Also explores the relationships between anatomy, behavior, and ecology on the individual and community level. Provides an evolutionary and ecological framework with which to view primates (including humans) and all living organisms. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPBS – Core, Pers, Biological Science

ANTH 311. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-NORTH AMERICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 311H

ANTH 311H. *PEOPLES WORLD-NORTH AMERICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 311

ANTH 312. *PEOPLES WORLD-EUROPE. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPWC – Core, Pers, West Culture

Equivalent to: ANTH 312H

ANTH 312H. *PEOPLES WORLD-EUROPE. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPWC – Core, Pers, West Culture; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 312

ANTH 313. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-LATIN AMERICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 313H

ANTH 313H. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-LATIN AMERICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 313

ANTH 314. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-MIDDLE EAST. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 314H

ANTH 314H. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-MIDDLE EAST. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 314

ANTH 315. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-AFRICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 315H

ANTH 315H. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-AFRICA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 315

ANTH 316. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

ANTH 317. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-PACIFIC. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

ANTH 318. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-CHINA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 318H

ANTH 318H. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-CHINA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

Prerequisites: ANTH 110 with D- or better or ANTH 210 with D- or better

Equivalent to: ANTH 318

ANTH 319. *PEOPLES OF THE WORLD-JAPAN AND KOREA. (3 Credits)

Survey of peoples around the world. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. (NC) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; LACN – Liberal Arts Non-Western Core

ANTH 330. *EVOLUTION OF PEOPLE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

Overview of the evolution and prehistory of the human species, including the development and interaction of human biology, technology, and society. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ANTH 331. MESOAMERICAN PREHISTORY. (3 Credits)

Explores the archaeology and prehistory of Mesoamerica from Paleo-Indian times through the Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec cultures to the Spanish Conquest. Themes include the transition to settled agriculture, emergence of social inequality and political authority, the role of the natural environment, and the rich cultural heritage of Mesoamerican civilizations.

ANTH 332. ARCHAEOLOGICAL INFERENCE. (4 Credits)

In this course on archaeological inference, or the thought process of forming our understanding about the past, we will take a guided tour of the main stages of archaeological research design and try our hand at making archaeological inferences. We begin by learning about the basic conceptual problems in the study of the past, then, we engage with the theories and models used to address them, and finally we apply this knowledge in hands-on analytical activities during the laboratory sessions with archaeological artifacts. Lec/lab.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 345. *BIOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL CONSTRUCTIONS OF RACE. (3 Credits)

The social, cultural, and historical context of human biological diversity in the United States. Students become acquainted with primary resources relating to biological diversity within the modern human species and will offer a critical perspective on racial/ethnic categorization of that diversity. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination

ANTH 350. LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

An examination of the communicative functions of language and the role of language in the construction of social relations. Covers the origins, structure, and diversity of language. Explores the relationships between language and thought and the use of linguistic models in the study of culture. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ANTH 352. *ANTHROPOLOGY, HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENT. (3 Credits)

Major threats to human health are increasingly linked to global environmental changes. This course engages medical and environmental anthropology research to critically explore the values, meanings and ideologies associated with ecological and public health issues in given localities throughout the world. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

ANTH 361. *FOOD JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Contemporary food systems are examined from a cultural and social justice perspective. The human right to food as recognized by the United Nations serves as the justice grounding point. Impediments to realizing the right to food will be examined in national and international contexts. (Bacc Core Course) (SS) CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 361.

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Equivalent to: FCSJ 361

ANTH 370. ^ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORIES. (4 Credits)

Foundational theories, approaches, and concepts are explored and used as a means to understanding how anthropologists past and present use theory. Students compare and contrast prominent theories, analyze current events and situations, and write a major research paper using anthropological sources.

Attributes: CWIC – Core, Skills, WIC

Prerequisites: ANTH 110 with D- or better

ANTH 371. RESEARCH METHODS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Designed for anthropology majors, this course involves students in learning about and practicing anthropological research methods. Students practice ethnographic fieldwork by conducting participant observation and interviews, writing fieldnotes, analyzing real-life material for cultural values and power differences, and writing up a research paper.

Prerequisites: ANTH 110 with D- or better

ANTH 372. *SOCIAL NETWORKS AND SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

Introduces the foundational theory and concepts of social network analysis (SNA) and explores practical applications of SNA in environmental science, public health, business, politics, education, and public life. Also explores how the Internet, social media, and other information and communication technologies are affecting social networks and culture in the 21st century. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

ANTH 373. APPROACHES TO SOCIAL JUSTICE. (3 Credits)

Students study various ways of thinking about social justice and evaluate these in case studies and current events. As a basis for the Social Justice minor, students write a research paper on the theoretical and practical aspects of a social justice issue. CROSSLISTED as ES 373, WGSS 373, WLC 373.

Equivalent to: ES 373, WGSS 373, WLC 373

ANTH 374. *ANTHROPOLOGY AND GLOBAL HEALTH. (3 Credits)

An overview of historical and contemporary issues in gender health with emphasis on politics, globalization, and the complex outcomes of interventions in diverse cultural settings. Students will articulate a critical and evidence-based perspective on complex global health issues. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

Equivalent to: ANTH 374H

ANTH 374H. *ANTHROPOLOGY AND GLOBAL HEALTH. (3 Credits)

An overview of historical and contemporary issues in gender health with emphasis on politics, globalization, and the complex outcomes of interventions in diverse cultural settings. Students will articulate a critical and evidence-based perspective on complex global health issues. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 374

ANTH 380. *CULTURES IN CONFLICT. (3 Credits)

Communication and commerce draw East and West, industrial and pre-industrial, state and stateless societies together. Beliefs and values clash and complement one another. Explores the processes of intercultural contact, cross-cultural interaction, and the consequences of global penetration of European-American culture. Evaluates theoretical explanations for cultural persistence and change. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Equivalent to: ANTH 380H

ANTH 380H. *CULTURES IN CONFLICT. (3 Credits)

Communication and commerce draw East and West, industrial and pre-industrial, state and stateless societies together. Beliefs and values clash and complement one another. Explores the processes of intercultural contact, cross-cultural interaction, and the consequences of global penetration of European-American culture. Evaluates theoretical explanations for cultural persistence and change. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues; HNRS – Honors Course Designator; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: ANTH 110 with D- or better

Equivalent to: ANTH 380

ANTH 383. *INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Examines human health and healing systems from evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives. Using a case study approach, this class explores individual- and population-level experiences of illness and healing, while providing students with the tools to evaluate global disease patterns and international health promotion and education programs. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

Equivalent to: ANTH 383H

ANTH 383H. *INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Examines human health and healing systems from evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives. Using a case study approach, this class explores individual- and population-level experiences of illness and healing, while providing students with the tools to evaluate global disease patterns and international health promotion and education programs. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 383

ANTH 399. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

Equivalent to: ANTH 399H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 399H. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 399

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 401. RESEARCH. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 402. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 403. THESIS. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 405. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-6 Credits)

Equivalent to: ANTH 405H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 405H. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-6 Credits)

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 405

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 406. PROJECTS. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 407. SEMINAR. (1-3 Credits)

Equivalent to: ANTH 407H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 407H. SEMINAR. (1-3 Credits)

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 407

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 409. PRACTICUM. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 410. INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

Opportunities for students at junior and first-term senior class levels to take advantage of off-campus work experiences during regular term sessions for academic credit. Allows students to broaden and deepen their understanding and appreciation of the value of their academic activity. Internship is supervised and evaluated by individual faculty members.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 420. WORLD CULTURES--TOPICS. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of world cultures. Early settlement, cultural history, ecological adaptations, population, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in culturally distinct regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on dispelling stereotypic images, both past and present. Includes three hours of lecture and one hour of seminar. Cannot be taken if student is taking or has completed the 300-level course in the same geographical area. Graded P/N.

ANTH 421. ANALYSIS OF LITHIC TECHNOLOGIES. (4 Credits)

Covers the principles, procedures, and purpose of archaeological lithic analysis and the anthropological interpretation of lithic technologies used by prehistoric hunter-gatherers.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 422. HISTORIC MATERIALS ANALYSIS. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the analytical and descriptive methods and techniques used by historical archeologists to study late 18th through 20th century machine and handmade objects.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 423. METHOD AND THEORY IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines the origins and growth of historical archaeology in the Americas. Students will critically learn about the linkages with history and anthropology and explore the theoretical underpinnings of historical archaeology.

ANTH 424. SETTLEMENT ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Explores the evolution of the theoretical underpinnings and field methods of settlement archaeology as well as the refinement of the meaning of .

ANTH 425. CERAMIC ANALYSIS IN ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Provides fundamental practical skills and theoretical perspectives for the analysis and interpretation of archaeological ceramics. On the practical side, students will learn both basic and advanced techniques for describing and analyzing pottery assemblages encountered by field archaeologists. On the theoretical side, the course will explore the diversity of research questions in which pottery can play a critical role, as well as the various ways in which ceramic data can be interpreted. Lec/lab.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 430. TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in archaeology and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better or ANTH 330 with D- or better

This course is repeatable for 99 credits.

ANTH 432. *DOMESTICATION, URBANIZATION, AND THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION. (4 Credits)

Reviews the development of culture in the Old and New Worlds with special emphasis placed on the when, where, and how of early domestication of plants and animals. Examines the process of urbanization. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

Equivalent to: ANTH 432H

ANTH 432H. *DOMESTICATION, URBANIZATION, AND THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION. (4 Credits)

Reviews the development of culture in the Old and New Worlds with special emphasis placed on the when, where, and how of early domestication of plants and animals. Examines the process of urbanization. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 432

ANTH 433. FIRST AMERICANS, LAST FRONTIERS. (4 Credits)

The initial human occupation of the Western Hemisphere is explored with particular emphasis on northeast Siberian cultural progenitors, routes and timing of entry into the Americas, population dispersal theory, the paleoenvironmental record, and human cultural responses to the conditions of the last frontier prior to 8,000 years ago.

ANTH 434. NORTH AMERICA AFTER THE ICE AGE. (4 Credits)

The development of regional hunting and gathering adaptive strategies in North America from 8000 B.C. to the historic period are examined against a backdrop of changing climate, natural disasters, population growth, and human invention.

ANTH 435. CULTURAL RESOURCES: POLICY AND PROCEDURES. (4 Credits)

Description and analysis of requirements and demands of cultural resource management. Historical development of cultural resource laws and appropriate field techniques and strategies to implement legislation.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 436. NORTHWEST PREHISTORY. (4 Credits)

Materials and theories relating to prehistoric aboriginal cultures of the Northwest. Evaluation of different theories on the origins and adaptations of prehistoric populations to ecological zones within the Northwest; comparisons of the cultural development through prehistoric times of the Columbia Plateau, intermontane and coastal zones of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Special emphasis on the theories of origin, subsequent development of prehistoric cultures in the Northwest, and the present circumstances of archaeology in the Northwest.

ANTH 437. GEOARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Provides an introduction to geoarchaeological concepts and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the use of geoscientific perspectives and datasets to solve archaeological problems.

Prerequisites: ANTH 230 with D- or better

ANTH 438. ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL. (10-12 Credits)

Practical skills, archaeological methods and techniques including use of equipment, site surveying and mapping techniques, site excavation strategies, record keeping, field cataloging, report writing, and field camp management.

ANTH 439. ARCHAEOLOGY OF FORAGERS. (4 Credits)

Provides an in-depth review of the concepts and approaches employed to study cultural aspects of past foraging peoples using archaeological research methods and theoretical perspectives.

ANTH 440. TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in physical anthropology and their applications to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 with D- or better or ANTH 330 with D- or better

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 441. HUMAN EVOLUTION. (4 Credits)

The evolutionary history of the primate order as it is represented by fossils of the Paleocene through the Holocene. Special attention given to development of the Hominoids in the Miocene, the Australopithecines in the Pliocene, and members of the genus Homo in the Pleistocene. Lec/lab.

Prerequisites: (ANTH 110 with D- or better or ANTH 210 with D- or better) and ANTH 240 [D-]

ANTH 442. HUMAN ADAPTABILITY. (4 Credits)

Overview of human biology and its various subfields, applications of human biology in areas of nutrition, health, growth, adaptation, and demography. Understanding adaptive variations among populations and individuals in responses to environment, disease, and nutritional stress.

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 with D- or better

ANTH 443. HUMAN OSTEOLOGY LAB. (4 Credits)

Identification and analysis of human skeletal materials in an archaeological context.

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 with D- or better

ANTH 444. NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines human nutrition and food systems from comparative, biocultural and evolutionary perspectives. Long-term evolutionary processes are examined within an ecological framework as significant factors affecting human biology and susceptibility to diet-related disease. An emphasis on anthropological methods in nutritional assessment including anthropometry, paleodietary assessment and nutritional participant-observation will provide students with the tools to evaluate human diet from skeletal and fossil collections through contemporary cross-cultural populations. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 444.

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 with C or better or ANTH 330 with C or better

Equivalent to: FCSJ 444

ANTH 446. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Concepts and practices in the use of anthropology in legal matters and police cases, especially involving identification of human remains.

Prerequisites: ANTH 443 with D- or better

ANTH 447. *ARCTIC PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBAL PROBLEMS. (4 Credits)

The Arctic is on the frontline of today's most pressing global problems. This course uses Arctic perspectives to explore issues affecting us all: climate change, environmental conservation, traditional ecological knowledge, development, energy extraction, indigenous rights, and indigenous media. Using insights from Arctic perspectives, we will plot pathways toward potential solutions. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity

Equivalent to: ANTH 447H

ANTH 447H. *ARCTIC PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBAL PROBLEMS. (4 Credits)

The Arctic is on the frontline of today's most pressing problems. This course uses Arctic perspectives to explore issues affecting us all: climate change, environmental conservation, traditional ecological knowledge, development, energy extraction, indigenous rights, and indigenous media. Using insights from Arctic perspectives, we will plot pathways toward potential solutions. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPCD – Core, Pers, Cult Diversity; HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 447

ANTH 448. EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE. (4 Credits)

Evolutionary medicine is founded on the idea that many challenges to human health can be accounted for by discordances between contemporary environments and those under which humans evolved. This course examines ways anthropologists may help to reframe questions about diseases within long-term, evolutionary contexts.

Prerequisites: (ANTH 110 with D- or better or ANTH 210 with D- or better) and (ANTH 240 [D-] or ANTH 330 [D-])

ANTH 449. BIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN REPRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

Examines human reproduction and sexuality from the perspective of the New Biocultural Synthesis, a theoretical approach in anthropology that examines the interface of evolved biological, sociocultural and political-economic factors that interact to produce complex human behaviors and biologies. Topics are presented from a life-history perspective where questions related to human reproduction and evolutionary history are examined across the lifespan from mating and conception through elderhood and menopause. Lec/lab.

ANTH 450. TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in the study of culture and communication and their application to special fields of knowledge. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 452. FOLKLORE AND EXPRESSIVE CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The study of folklore/popular culture in its social and historical context. Examines content, structure, communicative potential, and performative aspects of various forms of oral and written expression. Includes familiarization with the analysis of myths, legends, tall tales, proverbs, riddles, and play languages. (FA)

Attributes: LACF – Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core

ANTH 453. COMMUNITY HEALTH FIELD SCHOOL. (3-12 Credits)

Meets the growing need for international experiences for students in medical anthropology; international public health; and women, gender and sexuality studies. The field school is offered over a three- to seven-week period during the summer term. In-country time is flexible and can be adjusted depending on program requirements and financial constraints. Provides an intensive cross-cultural field experience in San Juan, Puerto Rico, that is premised on a model of community-engaged, service learning and applied, emancipatory research.

This course is repeatable for 12 credits.

ANTH 455. REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: A SERVICE LEARNING COURSE. (4 Credits)

Reproductive Justice is a service-learning course that aims to bridge theory and practice in reproductive health and social justice by developing connections between the university campus and members of the local community.

ANTH 459. LANGUAGE, RACE AND RACISM IN THE U.S.: ADVANCED STUDY. (4 Credits)

Students in this course will unpack language, race and racism--as well as the intersections between those ideas-- as cornerstones to understanding identity and society as inherently socially constructed ideas. The goal of this course is to better understand how racism is produced and reproduced in talk and text (this will include symbols and signs), especially in the context of the denial of racism. Our course will specifically focus on the language of racism, and, more specifically, types of discourse that construct Whiteness as dominant over Color. CROSSLISTED as ES 459/ES 559, WLC 459/WLC 559.

Equivalent to: ES 459, WLC 459

ANTH 460. ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD SCHOOL. (6 Credits)

Involves an intensive field experience, learning and developing practical skills for operating socially and culturally in another culture. Students engage in anthropological and mixed research topics, methods, and analysis, such as research ethics, research design, participant observation, ethnographic interviewing, community mapping, qualitative and quantitative data analysis.

ANTH 461. NEUROANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The emerging interdisciplinary field of neuroanthropology combines anthropological understandings of human biological and cultural variation with recent findings in neuroscience. Key topics include socialization and enculturation, addiction, ritual, depression, and psychiatric disorders.

Prerequisites: ANTH 240 with C- or better or ANTH 345 with C- or better or ANTH 383 with C- or better

ANTH 463. ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH: PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL CONDUCT. (4 Credits)

Examines the history and scope of professional and ethical guidelines in anthropology; critically evaluate major issues involving ethics, confidentiality, and anonymity that academic and professional anthropologists face during their careers.

ANTH 465. POPULAR CULTURE: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Introduces some of the debates and issues swirling around analyses of late twentieth-, early twenty-first century popular/mass/public/mediated/commercial culture. Learning about its pervasive forms, its origins and effects, how we are situated in it, and how it situates us is vital to understanding the changes that characterize our postmodern world.

ANTH 466. *RURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Concentrates on study of the socio-cultural dynamics in rural communities as they develop in national and global contexts of political and economic change. Includes anthropological readings on rural issues in domestic and international contexts and a research paper on a contemporary rural issue. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

ANTH 468. ANTHROPOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. (4 Credits)

Ethnographies of the organization of children's lives in different cultural contexts are combined with readings on the conceptual and methodological genealogies that have constructed children as research subjects in anthropology.

ANTH 469. ENERGY IN CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Examines historical and current trends in energy around the globe. Course themes include the role of energy in economic development, cultural innovation in energy production, social problems that arise from energy shortages or the uneven distribution of energy resources and social and cultural changes required as societies attempt to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels.

Prerequisites: ANTH 110 with D- or better or ANTH 210 with D- or better

ANTH 470. TOPICS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-16 Credits)

Covers recent advances in cultural anthropology and their applications to the field. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 471. CASH, CLASS AND CULTURE: HUNTER-GATHERERS TO CAPITALISM. (4 Credits)

Students explore the cultural and social effects of capitalism in the contemporary world within the larger question of how economics and society intersect and change over time. Special emphases are put on food and work, but students explore the linkages of global forces and local life in a variety of ways.

ANTH 472. CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ISSUES. (4 Credits)

Examines the background of Indian treaties and reservations with discussions of present issues such as health care, education, the Indian Child Welfare Act, fishing rights, and religious freedom. Issues are discussed in class with considerable class participation and some role playing.

ANTH 473. *GENDER, ETHNICITY, AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Study of the practices and ideologies of gender as they intersect with those of ethnicity, race, class, and culture. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

ANTH 474. CROSS-CULTURAL HEALTH AND HEALING. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive overview of current issues in global health with particular emphasis on social, cultural, and behavioral interventions. Explores issues of health and development in the international context, focusing on such issues as inequality, structural adjustment, economic development, and community-based approaches to health care, specific cultural beliefs and practices, and the influence of people's perceptions of health, illness, and healing.

ANTH 475. ANTHROPOLOGY IN PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

Capstone course for Anthropology majors. Discusses the use of anthropological skills and methods to solve real-world problems. Addresses professional opportunities for anthropologists; provides career development opportunities; and assesses learning outcomes for Anthropology majors.

ANTH 477. ECOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines past and present interactions between humans and their environments. Emphasizes the concept of system and process of human adaptation.

ANTH 478. *ANTHROPOLOGY OF TOURISM. (4 Credits)

Tourism is among the world's largest industries. The anthropology of tourism seeks to understand the relationships between the industry and the other cultural productions. Students explore the cultural practices and impacts of tourism in relation to both host and guest communities, and travel as cultural practice. Course is taught online and on Corvallis campus. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

ANTH 479. ANTHROPOLOGY OF MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Focuses on the multiple aspects of population movements around the globe. Investigates the history of recent human migration; current theories, trends and policies; as well as issues of immigrant incorporation and anti-immigrant politics.

ANTH 480. TOPICS IN APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in applied anthropology and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 481. *NATURAL RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY VALUES. (3 Credits)

Investigates relations between human communities and the values of community members. Resource issues integrate concepts from social science, economics, and ecology. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSST – Core, Synthesis, Science/Technology/Society

ANTH 482. *ANTHROPOLOGY OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

Examines the ideological and theoretical bases of world assistance programs and their effects on different sectors and classes, including women. Causes of world hunger in terms of agronomic, mainstream economic and radical economic paradigms are developed and contrasted. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

Equivalent to: AG 482

ANTH 483. ADVANCED MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

An overview of anthropological studies of the health of human communities from a biological and behavioral perspective. Topics include prehistory of disease, cultural perspectives on causation of disease and approaches to healing; anthropological approach to international health issues; and case studies.

Prerequisites: (ANTH 110 with D- or better or ANTH 210 with D- or better) and (ANTH 240 [D-] or ANTH 330 [D-])

ANTH 484. *WEALTH AND POVERTY. (3 Credits)

Summarizes the distribution of wealth observed cross-culturally and through time. Determines the relation between wealth distribution and economic productivity. Shows the impact of industrialization and economic wealth distribution in Western civilization and cross-culturally. Evaluates how cultural practices affect wealth distribution in Western and non-Western societies. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

ANTH 485. CAPSTONE IN SOCIAL JUSTICE. (2 Credits)

Working with an advisor from the Social Justice minor, students conduct research to synthesize and extend analysis of a particular social justice issue, building on three previous papers or projects. Results are presented in a 10-15 page paper and a public poster, presentation or website. CROSSLISTED as ES 485, WGSS 485, WLC 485.

Prerequisites: (ANTH 373 with D- or better or ES 373 with D- or better or WGSS 373 with D- or better or WLC 373 with D- or better) and (ANTH 410 [D-] or ES 410 [D-] or WGSS 410 [D-] or WLC 410 [D-])

Equivalent to: ES 485, WGSS 485, WLC 485

This course is repeatable for 4 credits.

ANTH 486. ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD. (4 Credits)

The role of food in human cultures, both past and present. Includes discussion of different food procurement styles, social movements and the political economy of food. Looks at the symbolic aspects of food as well as its relationship with the environment. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 486.

Equivalent to: FCSJ 486

ANTH 487. LANGUAGE IN GLOBAL CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

Deals with practical uses of linguistics in the global political arena. Explores use of official vs. unofficial languages, language standardization, the preservation of dying languages; problems in learning first and second languages, and the relevance of linguistic knowledge to education and cross-cultural communication.

Prerequisites: ANTH 251 with D- or better or ANTH 350 with D- or better

ANTH 490. TOPICS IN METHODOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in anthropological methodologies and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 492. ARCHAEOLOGICAL LABORATORY METHODS. (1-3 Credits)

Provides information on the basics of archaeological laboratory work. Students learn the day-to-day operations of a lab, how to classify and catalog artifacts, and how to do artifact analysis, research hypothesis.

ANTH 497. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS. (1-3 Credits)

Archaeological field strategies emphasizing reconnaissance and survey. Application of field equipment and project management.

ANTH 498. ORAL NARRATIVE. (3 Credits)

Methodology course focused on the collection and processing of multiple speech genres, including personal narrative, oral history, folklore, and songs. Attention is given to ethics, legal issues, different forms of transcription, and the politics of representation.

Prerequisites: ANTH 350 with D- or better

ANTH 499. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-16 Credits)

Equivalent to: ANTH 499H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 499H. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-16 Credits)

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ANTH 499

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 501. RESEARCH. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 502. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 503. THESIS. (1-12 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 999 credits.

ANTH 505. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 506. PROJECTS. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 507. SEMINAR. (1-3 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 509. PRACTICUM. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 510. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

Opportunities for students at junior and first-term senior class levels to take advantage of off-campus work experiences during regular term sessions for academic credit. Allows students to broaden and deepen their understanding and appreciation of the value of their academic activity. Internship is supervised and evaluated by individual faculty members.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 515. ADVANCED RESEARCH LITERATURE REVIEW. (3 Credits)

Provides graduate students with knowledge and experience in the advanced literature review process including construction of the literature review as product. One of the primary skills graduate students must master is advanced review of a body of literature for the research project. Mastery of the literature review process influences quality and sophistication of claims developed to justify research, with the written review clearly delineating the unique contribution of the student’s research and the knowledge gap that it fills. The literature review as a product is a strong written argument that builds a case from credible evidence based on previous research. CROSSLISTED as CSSA 515, ES 515, WGSS 515.

Equivalent to: CSSA 515, ES 515, WGSS 515

ANTH 519. BIOLOGIES OF POVERTY. (4 Credits)

A readings-based, discussion seminar on the applications of biological and biocultural anthropological theory to questions of embodiment and poverty. In it we will explore the ways key theoretical and methodological developments over the past two decades enable biocultural anthropologists to measure and explain the ways poverty and inequality become embedded beneath our skin--that is, the ways culture, belief, difference, power and discrimination are written on our bodies, and thus contribute to inequities in health outcomes across populations.

ANTH 521. ANALYSIS OF LITHIC TECHNOLOGIES. (4 Credits)

Covers the principles, procedures, and purpose of archaeological lithic analysis and the anthropological interpretation of lithic technologies used by prehistoric hunter-gatherers.

ANTH 522. HISTORIC MATERIALS ANALYSIS. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the analytical and descriptive methods and techniques used by historical archeologists to study late 18th through 20th century machine and handmade objects.

ANTH 523. METHOD AND THEORY IN HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines the origins and growth of historical archaeology in the Americas. Students will critically learn about the linkages with history and anthropology and explore the theoretical underpinnings of historical archaeology.

ANTH 524. SETTLEMENT ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Explores the evolution of the theoretical underpinnings and field methods of settlement archaeology as well as the refinement of the meaning of .

ANTH 525. CERAMIC ANALYSIS IN ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Provides fundamental practical skills and theoretical perspectives for the analysis and interpretation of archaeological ceramics. On the practical side, students will learn both basic and advanced techniques for describing and analyzing pottery assemblages encountered by field archaeologists. On the theoretical side, the course will explore the diversity of research questions in which pottery can play a critical role, as well as the various ways in which ceramic data can be interpreted. Lec/lab.

ANTH 530. TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in archaeology and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 531. ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY. (4 Credits)

Historical development of archaeological field techniques and theoretical concepts with an emphasis on modern method and theory in North American archaeology.

ANTH 533. FIRST AMERICANS, LAST FRONTIERS. (4 Credits)

The initial human occupation of the Western Hemisphere is explored with particular emphasis on northeast Siberian cultural progenitors, routes and timing of entry into the Americas, population dispersal theory, the paleoenvironmental record, and human cultural responses to the conditions of the last frontier prior to 8,000 years ago.

ANTH 534. NORTH AMERICA AFTER THE ICE AGE. (4 Credits)

The development of regional hunting and gathering adaptive strategies in North America from 8000 B.C. to the historic period are examined against a backdrop of changing climate, natural disasters, population growth, and human invention.

ANTH 535. CULTURAL RESOURCES: POLICY AND PROCEDURES. (4 Credits)

Description and analysis of requirements and demands of cultural resource management. Historical development of cultural resource laws and appropriate field techniques and strategies to implement legislation.

ANTH 536. NORTHWEST PREHISTORY. (4 Credits)

Materials and theories relating to prehistoric aboriginal cultures of the Northwest. Evaluation of different theories on the origins and adaptations of prehistoric populations to ecological zones within the Northwest; comparisons of the cultural development through prehistoric times of the Columbia Plateau, intermontane and coastal zones of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Special emphasis on the theories of origin, subsequent development of prehistoric cultures in the Northwest, and the present circumstances of archaeology in the Northwest.

ANTH 537. GEOARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Provides an introduction to geoarchaeological concepts and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the use of geoscientific perspectives and datasets to solve archaeological problems.

ANTH 538. ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL. (1-10 Credits)

Practical skills, archaeological methods and techniques including use of equipment, site surveying and mapping techniques, site excavation strategies, record keeping, field cataloging, report writing, and field camp management.

ANTH 539. ARCHAEOLOGY OF FORAGERS. (4 Credits)

Provides an in-depth review of the concepts and approaches employed to study cultural aspects of past foraging peoples using archaeological research methods and theoretical perspectives.

ANTH 540. TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in physical anthropology and their applications to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 541. HUMAN EVOLUTION. (4 Credits)

The evolutionary history of the primate order as it is represented by fossils of the Paleocene through the Holocene. Special attention given to development of the Hominoids in the Miocene, the Australopithecines in the Pliocene, and members of the genus Homo in the Pleistocene. Lec/lab.

ANTH 542. HUMAN ADAPTABILITY. (4 Credits)

Overview of human biology and its various sub fields, applications of human biology in areas of nutrition, health, growth, adaptation, and demography. Understanding adaptive variations among populations and individuals in responses to environment, disease, and nutritional stress.

ANTH 543. HUMAN OSTEOLOGY LAB. (4 Credits)

Identification and analysis of human skeletal materials in an archaeological context.

ANTH 544. NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines human nutrition and food systems from comparative, biocultural and evolutionary perspectives. Long-term evolutionary processes are examined within an ecological framework as significant factors affecting human biology and susceptibility to diet-related disease. An emphasis on anthropological methods in nutritional assessment including anthropometry, paleodietary assessment and nutritional participant-observation will provide students with the tools to evaluate human diet from skeletal and fossil collections through contemporary cross-cultural populations. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 544.

Equivalent to: FCSJ 544

ANTH 546. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Concepts and practices in the use of anthropology in legal matters and police cases, especially involving identification of human remains.

ANTH 547. METHODS IN FOOD IN CULTURE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES. (4 Credits)

Exposes graduate students to the methodological approaches and methods used in guiding empirical research on the socio-cultural aspects of food, focusing on vulnerable populations, food security, procurement, foodways, disasters, and climate change. Methodological approaches and methods as evidenced in peer-reviewed publications is the grounding for the course. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 547.

Equivalent to: FCSJ 547

ANTH 548. EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE. (4 Credits)

Evolutionary medicine is founded on the idea that many challenges to human health can be accounted for by discordances between contemporary environments and those under which humans evolved. This course examines ways anthropologists may help to reframe questions about diseases within long-term, evolutionary contexts.

ANTH 549. BIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN REPRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

Examines human reproduction and sexuality from the perspective of the New Biocultural Synthesis, a theoretical approach in anthropology that examines the interface of evolved biological, sociocultural and political-economic factors that interact to produce complex human behaviors and biologies. Topics are presented from a life-history perspective where questions related to human reproduction and evolutionary history are examined across the lifespan from mating and conception through elderhood and menopause. Lec/lab.

ANTH 550. TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in the study of culture and communication and their application to special fields of knowledge. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 551. LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The study of language in social context including the relationships between language and age, gender, personality, religion, ethnicity and social class. Examines pidgins, creoles, dialects, genres and the processes of language change.

ANTH 552. FOLKLORE AND EXPRESSIVE CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The study of folklore/popular culture in its social and historical context. Examines content, structure, communicative potential, and performative aspects of various forms of oral and written expression. Includes familiarization with the analysis of myths, legends, tall tales, proverbs, riddles, and play languages.

ANTH 553. COMMUNITY HEALTH FIELD SCHOOL. (3-12 Credits)

Meets the growing need for international experiences for students in medical anthropology; international public health; and women, gender and sexuality studies. The field school is offered over a three- to seven-week period during the summer term. In-country time is flexible and can be adjusted depending on program requirements and financial constraints. Provides an intensive cross-cultural field experience in San Juan, Puerto Rico, that is premised on a model of community-engaged, service learning and applied, emancipatory research.

This course is repeatable for 12 credits.

ANTH 555. REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: A SERVICE LEARNING COURSE. (4 Credits)

Reproductive Justice is a service-learning course that aims to bridge theory and practice in reproductive health and social justice by developing connections between the university campus and members of the local community.

ANTH 556. SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS: METHODS AND THEORY. (4 Credits)

An introduction to social network analysis (SNA), focusing on the methods of research design, data collection, and analysis. Students will learn key concepts and theories of SNA, apply these concepts to research projects in their chosen field, develop methods for collecting network data, and perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of these networks. Readings draw on studies of social networks from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, environmental studies, public health, and political science.

ANTH 559. LANGUAGE, RACE AND RACISM IN THE U.S.: ADVANCED STUDY. (4 Credits)

Students in this course will unpack language, race and racism--as well as the intersections between those ideas-- as cornerstones to understanding identity and society as inherently socially constructed ideas. The goal of this course is to better understand how racism is produced and reproduced in talk and text (this will include symbols and signs), especially in the context of the denial of racism. Our course will specifically focus on the language of racism, and, more specifically, types of discourse that construct Whiteness as dominant over Color. CROSSLISTED as ES 459/ES 559, WLC 459/WLC 559.

Equivalent to: ES 559, WLC 559

ANTH 560. ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD SCHOOL. (6 Credits)

Involves an intensive field experience, learning and developing practical skills for operating socially and culturally in another culture. Students engage in anthropological and mixed research topics, methods, and analysis, such as research ethics, research design, participant observation, ethnographic interviewing, community mapping, qualitative and quantitative data analysis.

ANTH 561. NEUROANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The emerging interdisciplinary field of neuroanthropology combines anthropological understandings of human biological and cultural variation with recent findings in neuroscience. Key topics include socialization and enculturation, addiction, ritual, depression, and psychiatric disorders.

ANTH 563. ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH: PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL CONDUCT. (4 Credits)

Examines the history and scope of professional and ethical guidelines in anthropology; critically evaluate major issues involving ethics, confidentiality, and anonymity that academic and professional anthropologists face during their careers.

ANTH 565. POPULAR CULTURE: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Introduces some of the debates and issues swirling around analyses of late twentieth-, early twenty-first century popular/mass/public/mediated/commercial culture. Learning about its pervasive forms, its origins and effects, how we are situated in it, and how it situates us is vital to understanding the changes that characterize our postmodern world.

ANTH 566. RURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Concentrates on study of socio-cultural dynamics in rural communities as they develop in national and global contexts of political and economic change. Includes anthropological readings on rural issues in domestic and international contexts and a research paper on a contemporary rural issue.

ANTH 567. AGRI-FOOD MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

Investigates the origins and contemporary status of producer and consumer food movements including, but not limited to, organics, agricultural labor movements, animal welfare, vegetarian and vegan movements, farmers' markets, and permaculture. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 567.

Equivalent to: FCSJ 567

ANTH 568. ANTHROPOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. (4 Credits)

Ethnographies of the organization of children's lives in different cultural contexts are combined with readings on the conceptual and methodological genealogies that have constructed children as research subjects in anthropology.

ANTH 569. ENERGY IN CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Examines historical and current trends in energy around the globe. Course themes include the role of energy in economic development, cultural innovation in energy production, social problems that arise from energy shortages or the uneven distribution of energy resources and social and cultural changes required as societies attempt to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels.

ANTH 570. TOPICS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-16 Credits)

Covers recent advances in cultural anthropology and their applications to the field. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 571. CASH, CLASS AND CULTURE: HUNTER-GATHERERS TO CAPITALISM. (4 Credits)

Students explore the cultural and social effects of capitalism in the contemporary world within the larger question of how economics and society intersect and change over time. Special emphases are put on food and work, but students explore the linkages of global forces and local life in a variety of ways.

ANTH 572. CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ISSUES. (4 Credits)

Examines the background of Indian treaties and reservations with discussions of present issues such as health care, education, the Indian Child Welfare Act, fishing rights, and religious freedom. Issues are discussed in class with considerable class participation and some role playing.

ANTH 573. GENDER, ETHNICITY, AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Study of the practices and ideologies of gender as they intersect with those of ethnicity, race, class, and culture.

ANTH 574. CROSS-CULTURAL HEALTH AND HEALING. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive overview of current issues in global health with particular emphasis on social, cultural, and behavioral interventions. Explores issues of health and development in the international context, focusing on such issues as inequality, structural adjustment, economic development, and community-based approaches to health care, specific cultural beliefs and practices, and the influences of people's perceptions of health, illness, and healing.

ANTH 575. THEORY OF CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Core ideas in the discipline of anthropology. Examination of the contributions to anthropological method and theory of the major schools of thought in the history of anthropology.

ANTH 576. ADVANCED ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

Investigates theories used by current anthropologists to explicate issues of concern in a world of movement, fragmentation, global-local interactions, individuation via state and media unequal power relations, and neoliberal agendas. Students will participate in discussions, essays and a paper that links these theories to their research topics for theses or dissertations.

ANTH 577. ECOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines past and present interactions between humans and their environments. Emphasizes the concept of system and process of human adaptation.

ANTH 578. ANTHROPOLOGY OF TOURISM. (4 Credits)

Examines the cultural practices and impacts of tourism in relation to both host and guest communities, and travel itself as a part of culture. We will explore theories of tourism and what role anthropology can play in influencing the industry and tourist and host relationships.

ANTH 579. ANTHROPOLOGY OF MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Focuses on the multiple aspects of population movements around the globe. Investigates the history of recent human migration; current theories, trends and policies; as well as issues of immigrant incorporation and anti-immigrant politics.

ANTH 580. TOPICS IN APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in applied anthropology and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 581. NATURAL RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY VALUES. (4 Credits)

Investigates relations between human communities and the values of community members. Resource issues integrate concepts from social science, economics, and ecology.

ANTH 582. ANTHROPOLOGY OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

Examines the ideological and theoretical bases of world assistance programs and their effects on different sectors and classes, including women. Causes of world hunger in terms of agronomic, mainstream economic and radical economic paradigms are developed and contrasted.

ANTH 583. ADVANCED MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

An overview of anthropological studies of the health of human communities from a biological and behavioral perspective. Topics include prehistory of disease, cultural perspectives on causation of disease and approaches to healing; anthropological approach to international health issues; and case studies.

ANTH 584. WEALTH AND POVERTY. (3 Credits)

Summarizes the distribution of wealth observed cross-culturally and through time. Determines the relation between wealth distribution and economic productivity. Shows the impact of industrialization and economic wealth distribution in Western civilization and cross-culturally. Evaluates how cultural practices affect wealth distribution in Western and non-Western societies.

ANTH 585. USES OF ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examines the practical applications of anthropological knowledge in historical and contemporary contexts. Focuses on planned social change and roles of anthropologists in interdisciplinary research and nonacademic settings such as international business, industrial relations, economic and technological development, education, legal institutions, environmental change, minority relations, health care, and cultural preservation. Emphasizes relevance to public policy and ethical issues associated with applications of anthropological knowledge.

ANTH 586. ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD. (4 Credits)

The role of food in human cultures, both past and present. Includes discussion of different food procurement styles, social movements and the political economy of food. Looks at the symbolic aspects of food as well as its relationship with the environment. CROSSLISTED as FCSJ 586.

Equivalent to: FCSJ 586

ANTH 587. LANGUAGE IN GLOBAL CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

Deals with practical uses of linguistics in the global political arena. Explores use of official vs. unofficial languages, language standardization, the preservation of dying languages; problems in learning first and second languages, and the relevance of linguistic knowledge to education and cross-cultural communication.

ANTH 588. BUSINESS AND ASIAN CULTURE. (3 Credits)

Examines the mutual influence of business organization and culture in Asia. Starts with the premise that a business organization contains a set of values. These values are analyzed as to their effect on society in general and some Asian societies in particular, including Japan, China, Korea, India, and Indonesia. A second area of investigation is the influence of Asian societies on the organization and practice of Western businesses both in Asia and the West.

ANTH 589. ANTHROPOLOGY OF BUSINESS. (3 Credits)

Students are exposed to the methods and perspectives used by anthropologists working in business. How does anthropology contribute in such areas as product development, workplace organization and communication, marketing and interfacing with technology? Students do a lengthy project in one of these areas and present it as if in a corporate setting.

ANTH 590. TOPICS IN METHODOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Recent advances in anthropological methodologies and their application to special fields of study. Topics vary from term to term.

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 591. ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS. (4 Credits)

Cultural descriptions are produced through systematic observation, elicitation, and analysis to achieve proximity to the insider's point of view. Covers techniques of interviewing, validating, and interpreting cultural data. Allows students to practice what they have learned.

ANTH 592. ARCHAEOLOGICAL LABORATORY METHODS. (1-3 Credits)

Provides information on the basics of archaeological laboratory work. Students learn the day-to-day operations of a lab, how to classify and catalog artifacts, and how to do artifact analysis.

ANTH 593. STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Develops the skills necessary to use statistical software to analyze and interpret numerical data. Covers descriptive statistics, correlation, and multivariate statistical procedures. Evaluate the adequacy of data for parametric and nonparametric statistical tests.

ANTH 594. LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY LAB. (1-3 Credits)

A training and practicum in the elicitation, transcription and analysis of language.

ANTH 595. ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Critical examination of research design and methodology in anthropology; analysis of methods and procedures of research in the subfields of anthropology.

ANTH 597. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS. (1-3 Credits)

Archaeological field strategies emphasizing reconnaissance and survey. Application of field equipment and project management.

ANTH 598. ORAL TRADITIONS. (3 Credits)

Method of examining unwritten culture preserved in speech, including local history, folklore, and songs passed from one generation to another. May include the use of life history, genealogy, and other means of collecting information. Attention is given to ethics, legal issues, and the process of transcription.

ANTH 599. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 601. RESEARCH. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 602. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-6 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 603. THESIS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 999 credits.

ANTH 605. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 606. PROJECTS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 607. SEMINAR. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 610. INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 695. ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Doctoral student seminar focused on the research process, from the selection of a research topic, to the choice of appropriate methods for data collection and analysis, to the submission of a research proposal. Class assignments will result in completion of a research proposal. Seminal discussion will focus on problem formulation, statement of objectives, theoretical background, methodological approach, analytical techniques, ethical responsibilities, justification for the research, data analysis and interpretation, and budgetary concerns.

ANTH 699. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ANTH 808. WORKSHOPS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.