Economics (ECON)

ECON 199. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 201. *INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

An introduction to microeconomic principles including the study of price theory, economic scarcity, consumer behavior, production costs, the theory of the firm, market structure, and income distribution. Other selected topics may include market failure, international economics, and public finance. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ECON 202. *INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

An introduction to macroeconomic principles including study of the theories of output determination, consumption, investment, inflation, unemployment, and fiscal and monetary policy. Other selected topics may include the study of the international balance of payments, growth and development, and urban and regional problems. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPSI – Core, Pers, Soc Proc & Inst; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

ECON 311. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

An examination of demand theory, production and cost theory, game theory, behavioral economics, competitive and imperfectly competitive markets, and general equilibrium and welfare economics. ECON 311 and ECON 411 cannot both be taken for credit toward the economics major.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better

ECON 315. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

An examination of macroeconomic aggregates, income determination, aggregate demand and supply. The basic macroeconomic models will be discussed such as Keynesian, Classical, Monetarist, and Neo-Classical. ECON 315 and ECON 415 cannot both be taken for credit toward the Economics major.

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (ECON 202 [D-] or ECON 202H [D-])

ECON 329. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Mathematical methods of economic analysis. Theory of economic structure and optimization developed through calculus and linear algebra, dynamic systems analyzed through integral calculus and difference and differential equations. The mathematical tools are developed in conjunction with their application to economic problems. Some acquaintance with calculus recommended.

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (ECON 202 [D-] or ECON 202H [D-]) and (MTH 241 [D-] or MTH 251 [D-] or MTH 251H [D-])

ECON 330. MONEY AND BANKING. (4 Credits)

Nature and functions of money; functions and operations of depository institutions; the money market; central banking and monetary policy. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (ECON 202 [D-] or ECON 202H [D-])

ECON 340. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

An overview of international economics with an emphasis on current events and applications, including classical and modern trade theory and the study of trade and exchange-rate policies. (SS) (See Schedule Comment regarding Bacc Core status.)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (ECON 202 [D-] or ECON 202H [D-])

ECON 350. FINANCIAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Discusses how various securities meet the needs of different economic agents and the efficiency of financial markets in meeting those needs. Topics include interest rates, valuation, investment risk, trading and market structure, arbitrage, market efficiency, debt markets, equity markets, and financial derivatives.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with D- or better and ECON 202 [D-]

ECON 352. *ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND POLICY. (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of the interrelationships between economic activity, the environment, and public policy. Through case studies, discussion groups, readings, and group activities, students learn how economists define and analyze environmental problems and the types of policies they advocate for managing environmental quality. CROSSLISTED as AEC 352. (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CSGI – Core, Synth, Global Issues

Prerequisites: AEC 250 with D- or better or AREC 250 with D- or better or ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better

Equivalent to: AEC 352

ECON 383. *THE ECONOMICS OF DISCRIMINATION. (4 Credits)

An economic analysis of discrimination, focusing on labor market inequities for women and minorities. Historical and current trends in pay, education, and employment disparities, economic explanations for such disparities, and econometric evidence for wage and employment discrimination. (SS) (Bacc Core Course)

Attributes: CPDP – Core, Perspective, Difference/Power/Discrimination; LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with C- or better or ECON 201H with C- or better

ECON 399. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

Equivalent to: ECON 399H

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 399H. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

Attributes: HNRS – Honors Course Designator

Equivalent to: ECON 399

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 401. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 402. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 403. THESIS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 405. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 406. PROJECTS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 407. SEMINAR. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 408. WORKSHOP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 410. INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 411. ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

Rigorous treatment of optimizing behavior of economic agents and markets. Examines utility maximization and demand; cost minimization, profit maximization and supply; perfect competition and monopoly; imperfect competition and game theory; and general equilibrium, social welfare and market failure using sophisticated mathematical tools. Students cannot receive credit toward the major for both ECON 311 and ECON 411.

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (MTH 241 [D-] or MTH 251 [D-] or MTH 251H [D-])

ECON 414. BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Economic analysis of the effects of social, cognitive, and emotional factors on individual decision making and their implications for market outcomes and policy making. Topics include time inconsistency, decision making under risk, cognitive dissonance, heuristics, social preferences, and experimental economics.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 415. ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

Macroeconomics as an application of general equilibrium theory. Macroeconomic models are developed taking preferences and technology as primitives. The models' short and long run predictions are analyzed and compared to the data. The welfare implications of fiscal and monetary policy are discussed. ECON 315 and ECON 415 cannot both be taken for credit toward the major.

Prerequisites: (ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better) and (ECON 202 [D-] or ECON 202H [D-]) and (MTH 241 [D-] or MTH 251 [D-] or MTH 251H [D-])

ECON 420. GAME THEORY. (4 Credits)

Systematically studies strategic interactions among multiple decision makers with applications in economics, politics, sociology, law, computer science, sports, and biology. Topics taught include static, sequential, and repeated games of perfect and imperfect information.

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 423. PRE-ECONOMETRICS. (4 Credits)

Introduction to probability and statistics with an emphasis on estimation and hypothesis testing. Applications to economic models.

Prerequisites: MTH 241 with D- or better or MTH 251 with D- or better or MTH 251H with D- or better

ECON 424. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS. (4 Credits)

Application of statistical techniques, including sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and multiple regression analysis, to economic models. Economic modeling, analysis of economic data, and policy analysis are emphasized. ECON 424 and ECON 427 cannot both be taken for credit toward the major. Lec/lab.

Prerequisites: (ECON 311 with C or better or ECON 411 with C or better) and (ST 351 [C] or ST 351H [C] or ECON 423 [C])

ECON 427. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS WITH CALCULUS. (4 Credits)

Addresses both the theory and practice of econometrics, including properties of estimators, modeling economic processes, estimation, hypothesis testing, prediction and interpretation of results. Students cannot receive credit toward the major for both ECON 424 and ECON 427. Lec/lab.

Prerequisites: (ECON 311 with C or better or ECON 411 with C or better) and ECON 423 [C]

ECON 428. ^INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC RESEARCH. (4 Credits)

Basic methods of economic research: concepts and models; data sources, collection, and presentation; hypothesis formulation and testing; policy analysis. Written assignments apply methods. (Writing Intensive Course)

Attributes: CWIC – Core, Skills, WIC

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with C- or better or ECON 411 with C- or better

ECON 435. PUBLIC ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Composition and growth of government spending; theory of public expenditure; analysis of public expenditure programs; benefit-cost analysis; theory and practice of taxation; analysis of local, state, and federal taxes; government borrowing and fees; current issues in tax and expenditure policy.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with C- or better or ECON 411 with C- or better

ECON 439. ^PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Theory of public problems and decision making. Evaluation of public policy strategies, selected public programs and individual public projects considering the full range of efficiency and equity effects. Direct and indirect impacts of policy, strength of implicit incentives, administrative feasibility, and problems of policy implementation. (Writing Intensive Course)

Attributes: CWIC – Core, Skills, WIC

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 440. ECONOMICS OF GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

Examination of the phenomenon of globalization using economic analysis to explore controversial themes of the globalization debate--offshoring, sweatshops, child labor, environmental standards, intellectual property protection, cultural diversity, economic development, immigration, and governance.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better

ECON 441. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE THEORY AND POLICY. (4 Credits)

Theories and policies of exchange rate regimes; fixed, floating and managed floats; internal and external trade and capital balances; international capital flows and institutions.

Prerequisites: ECON 315 with D- or better

ECON 455. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

History, theories and policies for economic development in the Third World of underdeveloped countries. (SS)

Attributes: LACS – Liberal Arts Social Core

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with D- or better and ECON 202 [D-]

ECON 460. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION THEORY AND POLICY. (4 Credits)

The study of the causes of market structure, the behavior of firms in game theoretic settings, and the welfare implications of competitive and imperfectly competitive markets; United States antitrust and other laws regulating business behavior.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 461. LAW, ECONOMICS, AND REGULATION. (4 Credits)

The analysis of the effectiveness of laws and government regulations in fostering economic efficiency and fairness. Topics include the design of laws and policies to promote social welfare and the study of the effectiveness of criminal law, antitrust law, and the government regulation of business in promoting social goals.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better

ECON 462. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

The application of microeconomic theory and quantitative methods to management decisions. Case-oriented course emphasizing actual business decisions.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 463. EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIVITY ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Workshop on the theory and measurement of performance, especially efficiency and productivity. Emphasis on application including introduction to user-friendly software.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with C or better or ECON 411 with C or better

ECON 466. ^ECONOMICS OF TRADITIONAL AND RENEWABLE ENERGY. (4 Credits)

Reviews and analyzes the economics and structure of world markets for various traditional energy (e.g., oil, coal, natural gas), as well as renewable energy (wind, geothermal and solar) with the latter focusing on the Pacific Northwest electrical industry structure and regulatory framework. (Writing Intensive Course)

Attributes: CWIC – Core, Skills, WIC

Prerequisites: ECON 201 with D- or better or ECON 201H with D- or better

ECON 480. LABOR ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL POLICY. (4 Credits)

Interaction of workers and firms in labor markets, social policy and its effects on labor markets, human capital theory and education policy, discrimination and other sources of wage differentials, immigration, unemployment, inequality.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 491. ECONOMICS OF INEQUALITY. (4 Credits)

An analysis of economic inequality. Describing and measuring inequality, historical and current trends in inequality, causes and consequences of inequality, and policy implications.

Prerequisites: ECON 311 with D- or better or ECON 411 with D- or better

ECON 499. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 501. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 502. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 503. THESIS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 999 credits.

ECON 505. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 506. PROJECTS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 507. SEMINAR. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 510. INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 512. MICROECONOMIC THEORY I. (4 Credits)

Economic theories of consumer behavior and demand, production, cost, the firm, supply, and competitive and monopoly market structures.

ECON 513. MICROECONOMIC THEORY II. (4 Credits)

Economic theories of imperfect competition, input markets, general equilibrium and welfare economics.

ECON 514. BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Economic analysis of the effects of social, cognitive, and emotional factors on individual decision making and their implications for market outcomes and policy making. Topics include time inconsistency, decision making under risk, cognitive dissonance, heuristics, social preferences, and experimental economics.

ECON 515. MACROECONOMIC THEORY I. (4 Credits)

Determination of income, employment, and prices in classical, Keynesian, monetarist, and new classical macroeconomic models. Theories of consumption, investment, money demand, and money supply. Monetary and fiscal policies, the role of expectations.

ECON 517. MICROECONOMIC THEORY FOR MPP. (4 Credits)

Familiarizes MPP students who do not have a strong background in microeconomics with the material they will need for their future economics course work.

ECON 520. GAME THEORY. (4 Credits)

Systematically studies strategic interactions among multiple decision makers with applications in economics, politics, sociology, law, computer science, sports, and biology. Topics taught include static, sequential, and repeated games of perfect and imperfect information.

ECON 523. STATISTICS FOR ECONOMETRICS. (4 Credits)

Examines mathematical and statistical topics essential for graduate-level econometric analysis, including matrix algebra, probability and distribution theory (emphasizing joint and conditional distributions), statistical inference, and econometric optimization algorithms.

ECON 524. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS. (4 Credits)

Application of statistical techniques, including sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and multiple regression analysis, to economic models. Economic modeling, analysis of economic data, and policy analysis are emphasized.

ECON 525. ECONOMETRIC METHODS. (4 Credits)

The use of multiple regression under generalized assumptions, specification problems, an introduction to simultaneous equation estimation, the classical linear model using matrices. Emphasis on the analysis of data and communication of findings.

Prerequisites: ECON 523 with C or better

ECON 526. APPLIED ECONOMETRICS. (4 Credits)

Model building, hypothesis testing, and appropriate estimation procedures including generalized least squares, seemingly unrelated regressions, simultaneous equations, maximum likelihood, and limited dependent variables. Emphasis on applications and interpretation of results.

ECON 535. PUBLIC ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

Composition and growth of government spending; theory of public expenditure; analysis of public expenditure programs; benefit-cost analysis; theory and practice of taxation; analysis of local, state, and federal taxes; government borrowing and fees; current issues in tax and expenditure policy.

ECON 539. PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Theory of public problems and decision making. Evaluation of public policy strategies, selected public programs and individual public projects considering the full range of efficiency and equity effects. Direct and indirect impacts of policy, strength of implicit incentives, administrative feasibility, and problems of policy implementation.

ECON 540. ECONOMICS OF GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

Examination of the phenomenon of globalization using economic analysis to explore controversial themes of the globalization debate--offshoring, sweatshops, child labor, environmental standards, intellectual property protection, cultural diversity, economic development, immigration, and governance.

ECON 541. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE THEORY AND POLICY. (4 Credits)

Theories and policies of exchange rate regimes; fixed, floating and managed floats; internal and external trade and capital balances; international capital flows and institutions.

ECON 555. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

History, theories and policies for economic development in the Third World of underdeveloped countries.

ECON 560. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION THEORY AND POLICY. (4 Credits)

The study of the causes of market structure, the behavior of firms in game theoretic settings, and the welfare implications of competitive and imperfectly competitive markets; United States antitrust and other laws regulating business behavior.

ECON 561. LAW, ECONOMICS, AND REGULATION. (4 Credits)

The analysis of the effectiveness of laws and government regulations in fostering economic efficiency and fairness. Topics include the design of laws and policies to promote social welfare and the study of the effectiveness of criminal law, antitrust law, and the government regulation of business in promoting social goals.

ECON 562. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

The application of microeconomic theory and quantitative methods to management decisions. Case-oriented course emphasizing actual business decisions.

ECON 563. EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIVITY ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Workshop on the theory and measurement of performance, especially efficiency and productivity. Emphasis on application including introduction to user-friendly software.

ECON 566. ECONOMICS OF TRADITIONAL AND RENEWABLE ENERGY. (4 Credits)

Reviews and analyzes the economics and structure of world markets for various traditional energy (e.g., oil, coal, natural gas), as well as renewable energy (wind, geothermal and solar) with the latter focusing on the Pacific Northwest electrical industry structure and regulatory framework.

ECON 570. MACROECONOMIC THEORY I. (4 Credits)

Introduction to dynamic macroeconomic theory, including a review of Keynesian models, continuous and discrete time programming, Solow, Ramsey, and endogenous growth models, and real business cycle theory.

ECON 580. LABOR ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL POLICY. (4 Credits)

Interaction of workers and firms in labor markets, social policy and its effects on labor markets, human capital theory and education policy, discrimination and other sources of wage differentials; immigration, unemployment, inequality.

ECON 601. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 602. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 603. THESIS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 999 credits.

ECON 605. READING AND CONFERENCE. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 606. PROJECTS. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 607. SEMINAR. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.

ECON 610. INTERNSHIP. (1-16 Credits)

This course is repeatable for 16 credits.