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Major 

Gerontology Certificate (CERT)

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College of Public Health and Human Sciences | School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences | Interdisciplinary Program Detail


Carolyn Aldwin, Director
Program on Gerontology
Waldo Hall 437
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-5102
541-737-2024
Email: Kaycee.headley@oregonstate.edu 
Website: http://health.oregonstate.edu/sbhs/gerontology


Undergraduate Certificate Program

Gerontology

Graduate Minor

Gerontology

Area of Concentration
Gerontology


The Program on Gerontology offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of aging. Because aging involves physiological, sociological, and psychological processes, gerontology education and research is relevant to many disciplines. Career opportunities in gerontology are extremely diverse and include positions in community services, health sciences, nutrition and dietetics, housing, health and physical education, pharmacy, counseling, health care administration, business, public policy, and many other arenas.

Recognizing the diversity of relevant disciplines and career opportunities, the OSU Program on Gerontology offers course work in gerontology through 10 schools/departments. The program is administered through the School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences.

To be considered a gerontology course, at least 50 percent of the course content must address gerontology-related issues.

In addition to gerontology courses, seminars, field study (310/410/510/610), research (401/501/601), and projects (406/506/606) in gerontology are offered through the Gerontology Program. Field study, research, and projects in gerontology may also be available through other schools/departments. Students register for field study, research, or projects credit in the school or department that best meets their needs for supervision given the nature of the experience.

Graduate Study in Gerontology

OSU offers over 20 graduate-level gerontology courses plus field study and research opportunities. There are three ways to pursue significant graduate work in gerontology at OSU:

  1. Gerontology may be selected as an area of concentration for both master's and doctoral degrees in Human Development and Family Studies. Students choosing this concentration will select adult development and aging course work and research in their major and may choose an integrated minor in gerontology.
  2. Gerontology is an integrated graduate minor (i.e., courses chosen from a variety of schools/departments) available to graduate students in any major field. The minor requires 18–36 credits, including HDFS 587, Social Gerontology. The balance of the course work is selected from graduate gerontology courses, field study, and/or research.
  3. Gerontology is an area of study in the Master's of Interdisciplinary Studies (MAIS) program. MAIS students are required to take a minimum of 15 credits in gerontology, including HDFS 587, Social Gerontology. The balance of courses is selected from graduate gerontology courses, field study, and/or research.


Certificate Requirements, Program on Gerontology


Gerontology Core Courses (10 credits)

HDFS 314 Adult Development and Aging (4)

Any two of the following selected from two different departments:
DHE 434. Housing the Aging Population (3)
EXSS 414. Physical Activity and Aging (3) [Terminated fall 2015]
H 422. Health, Aging and Control of Chronic Disease (4)
NUTR 325. Nutrition Through the Life Cycle (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (4)
SOC 355. Death and Dying (4)

Gerontology courses include:

DHE 434/DHE 534. Housing the Aging Population (3)
EXSS 414. Physical Activity and Aging (3) [Terminated fall 2015]
H 422/H 522. Health, Aging and Control of Chronic Diseases (4)
H 432/H 532. Economic Issues in Health and Medical Care (3)
H 436. Advanced Topics in Health Care Management (3)
H 458/H 558. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
H 465/H 565. *Public Health and Women: Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 467/H 567. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 468/H 568. Financing and Administration of Long-Term Care (3)
H 476. ^Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs (4)
H 536. Healthcare Organization Theory and Behavior (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
HDFS 314. Adult Development and Aging (4)
HDFS 465/HDFS 565. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences (3)
HDFS 518. Adult Development and Aging (4)
HDFS 519. The Life Course (4)
HDFS 587. Social Gerontology (3)
HDFS 617. Advanced Topics in Adult Development and Aging (3)
PHL 444/PHL 544. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PHL 455/PHL 555. Death and Dying (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (4)
SOC 432/SOC 532. Sociology of Aging (3)

Note: Other courses are approved annually by the Gerontology Program.

Field study or field projects in Gerontology — Any Department (1–16 credits)

In addition to gerontology courses, seminars, field study (310/410/510/610), research (401/501/601), and projects (406/506/606) in gerontology are offered through the Gerontology Program.

Field study is a vital component of the Gerontology Certificate program. Three to six credits of an approved field experience or an approved research or field project are required. No more than six credits of field study will count toward certificate completion. Field Experience or Internships involve professional level work experience in an agency or organization that serves older adults. To be considered a gerontology field placement, at least half of the student's time must be spent working with or for older individuals.

Ordinarily, nine credits of gerontology course work must be completed prior to beginning field study. Specific requirements for field study are cooperatively developed by the faculty supervisor, student, and a community agency. The type of field study selected should reflect the student's career interests, as well as the student's competencies and the community agency's needs.

Field study in gerontology must be approved by the Program on Gerontology if it is to be used to meet Certificate requirements. Approval forms are available from the Program on Gerontology.

Electives from list of approved Gerontology Classes (12–15 credits)

Twelve to 15 credits of gerontology electives are required beyond the gerontology core to complete the minimum of 27 credits of gerontology study. A list of courses approved for electives appears below.

DHE 434/DHE 534. Housing the Aging Population (3)
H 320. Introduction to Human Disease (3)
H 422/H 522. Health, Aging and Control of Chronic Diseases (4)
H 432/H 532. Economic Issues in Health and Medical Care (3)
H 436. Advanced Topics in Health Care Management (3)
H 458/H 558. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
H 465/H 565. *Public Health and Women: Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 467/H 567. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 468/H 568. Financing and Administration of Long-Term Care (3)
H 476. ^Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs (4)
H 536. Healthcare Organization Theory and Behavior (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
HDFS 461. ^Program Development and Proposal Writing (3)
HDFS 462. Skills for Human Services Professionals (4)
HDFS 465/HDFS 565. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences (3)
HDFS 518. Adult Development and Aging (4)
HDFS 519. The Life Course (4)
HDFS 587. Social Gerontology (3)
HDFS 617. Advanced Topics in Adult Development and Aging (3)
KIN 434. Applied Muscle Physiology (3)
KIN 437. Physical Activity, Aging, and Chronic Disease (4)
NUTR 312. *Issues in Nutrition and Health (3)
NUTR 325. Nutrition Through the Life Cycle (3)
NUTR 423/NUTR 523. Community Nutrition (4)
PHL 444/PHL 544. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PHL 455/PHL 555. Death and Dying (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (4)
SOC 355. Death and Dying (4) 

Additional Requirements

  1. A grade of "C" or better in all gerontology courses. Overall GPA of 2.5.
  2. Formal application to the program; forms available from the program office in 437 Waldo Hall.
  3. Certificate requirements fulfilled within five years following graduation. Students who have not completed certificate requirements upon receipt of the degree may continue as special, postbaccalaureate, or graduate students.


Major Code: C437

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