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Major 

Animal Sciences Undergraduate Major (BS, CRED, HBS)

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College of Agricultural Sciences | Animal and Rangeland Sciences


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Animal Behavior
Animal BioHealth/Pre-Professional
Animal Production
Equine
Rangeland Science

Programs in animal sciences provide up-to-date information on methods of rearing livestock and poultry, that produce meat, milk, eggs, wool, and other animal products. In addition, the department addresses the care of animals that enhance human well-being through companionship, recreation, and human aid such as horses and companion animals. Essential to this information is knowledge generated from the fields of animal behavior/bioethics, genetics, nutrition, and physiology. The various teaching and research programs explore modern areas of animal biotechnology and data processing and how they apply to present day livestock and poultry production. Study in these areas provides the core around which various curricula leading to the BS degree in Animal Sciences can be developed. To allow students flexibility in course arrangement, three specialized program options are offered.

Increasing demands for livestock and poultry products by a rapidly expanding human population mean potential employment for well-trained individuals in such areas as farm, ranch, feedlot operation; meat, poultry, egg and milk processing, meat grading with the USDA; Federal Cooperative Extension Service, county and 4-H work; sales or technical employment with commercial feed, seed, and chemical companies and pharmaceutical houses; agricultural loan officer; government agency positions at local, state and federal levels; the Peace Corps; animal welfare auditing; as well as in journalism, mass media, and public policy. The expanding support structure for companion animals has created a growing job market for graduates in areas such as animal behavior consultant; veterinary technician (animal nurse); and business management. In addition, students become prepared to go on to advanced studies in animal sciences, veterinary medicine, and education.

Graduate students may pursue research projects through the Agricultural Experiment Station as part of their programs for MS or PhD degrees. Graduate areas of concentration are offered in animal nutrition, dairy production, embryo physiology, endocrinology, ethology, growth and development, livestock management, muscle biology and meat science, nutritional biochemistry, reproductive physiology.

Cooperative Programs

Students transferring after one or two years at a community college should also be able to complete the requirements for a BS after three or two years, respectively.

Rangeland Resource Management

Rangeland resource management is one of the family of natural resources professions important to the social, economic, and political development of Oregon, the nation, and the world. It is based upon ecological principles and is concerned with the restoration, improvement, conservation, and use of rangelands. Since range management is practiced on lands producing domestic and wild animals, timber, water, and recreation, concepts of integrated land use are included in the curriculum. A balance of soil, domestic animal, wildlife, ecology, and other biological sciences is realized in the educational program.

The curriculum below includes university and departmental requirements for the BS degree and provides emphasis either in science, management, ecology, or allied disciplines. The BS degree is also offered on the campus of Eastern Oregon University at La Grande through an extension of the OSU Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences. Facilities for study include classroom and field-oriented educational environments both on-campus and at locations throughout Oregon. Field trips are taken in conjunction with specific courses.

Graduate work leading to MAIS, MS, or PhD degrees may involve research on domestic or wild animals, rangeland nutrition, community ecology, physiology of rangeland plants, rangeland improvement, rangeland watershed, and riparian zone management, rangeland restoration, utilization and management, agroforestry and landscape ecology.

Summer employment with private industry, government agencies, and on range research projects makes possible learning experiences while earning a salary. Employment opportunities include resource management, research, Extension, ranch management, college and university teaching, business and industrial activities related to rangeland resources, and foreign agricultural and resource development assistance.

The Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences is accredited by the Society for Range Management. It is recognized throughout the country as one of the leading institutions of rangeland management.



Baccalaureate Core (51)


Animal Sciences Core

ANS 121. *Introduction to Animal Sciences (4)
ANS 207. Sophomore Seminar (2)
ANS 251. Principles of Animal Foods Technology (3)
ANS 311. Principles of Animal Nutrition (3)
ANS 313. Applied Animal Nutrition: Feeds and Ration Formulation (4)
ANS 314. Animal Physiology (4)
ANS 316. Reproduction in Domestic Animals (4)
ANS 317. Reproduction in Domestic Animals Laboratory (1)
ANS 378. Animal Genetics (4)
ANS 420. ^Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture (3)

Two animal industries courses from:
ANS 215. Beef/Dairy Industries (3)
ANS 216. Sheep/Swine Industries (3)
ANS 217. Poultry Industries (3)
ANS 220. Introductory Horse Science (3)
ANS 280. Companion Animal Management (4)

Two production courses from:
ANS 430. Equine Systems I: Exercise Science (4)
   or ANS 431. Equine Systems II: Nutrition (3)
   or ANS 432. Equine Systems III: Reproduction (4)
ANS 433. Poultry Meat Production Systems (3)
   or ANS 434. Egg Production Systems (3)
ANS 436. Sheep Production Systems (3)
ANS 439. Dairy Production Systems (4)
ANS 445. Beef Production Systems (4)
ANS 456. Companion Animal Production Systems (3)
ANS 460. Swine Production Systems (4)

+Select TWO courses from advanced ANS classes or electives (minimum of 6 credits).
ANS 315. *Contentious Social Issues in Animal Agriculture (3)
ANS 321. Avian Embryo (4)
ANS 327. Applied Physiology of Reproduction (5)
ANS 331. Advanced Livestock Evaluation (4)
ANS 333. Equine Stable Management (3)
ANS 351. Advanced Principles of Animal Foods Technology (4)
ANS 380. Principles of Animal Anatomy and Physiology (3)
ANS 385. Foundations of Mammalian Histology (3)
ANS 390. Gross Anatomy of Domestic Animals (4)
ANS 401. Research (1–16)
ANS 410. Animal Science Internship (3 credits maximum will count toward the two-class requirement)
ANS 415. Livestock Judging Team (3)
ANS 435. Applied Animal Behavior (3)
ANS 441. Topics in Animal Learning (3)
ANS 452. Livestock Housing and Waste Management (3)
ANS 511. Digestive Physiology and Nutrition of Ruminant Animals (4)
ANS 512. Monogastric and Poultry Nutrition (3)
Additional ANS Production Systems Course (3)

Select 20 credits from the Agriculture Category (Choose any courses in agricultural field or natural resources area.)

Physical and Biological Sciences

BI 211, BI 212, BI 213. *Principles of Biology (4,4,4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5) and CH 122, CH 123. *General Chemistry (5,5)
   or CH 231, CH 232, CH 233. *General Chemistry (4,4,4) and CH 261, CH 262, CH 263. *Laboratory for Chemistry 231, 232, 233 (1,1,1)
CH 130. General Chemistry of Living Systems (4)
   or CH 331. Organic Chemistry (4)
   or BB 331. *Introduction to Molecular Biology (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
   or MB 302. General Microbiology (3)
MTH 111. *College Algebra (4)

Statistics

ST 201. Principles of Statistics (4)
   or ST 351. Introduction to Statistical Methods (4)

Business

Choose one from below:
AEC 211. Agricultural and Food Management(4)
AEC 221. Agricultural and Food Marketing (3)
BA 215. Fundamentals of Accounting (4)
BA 230. Business Law I (4)
BA 260. Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4)

Footnotes:

* Baccalaureate Core Course (BCC)
^ Writing Intensive Course (WIC)

 

Sample Four-Year Plan: Animal Sciences Major


Year 1


Fall

ANS 121. Introduction to Animal Sciences (4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
MTH (4) Need math levels through MTH 111 (College Algebra). 
   or WR 121. *English Composition (3) Taken in Fall, Winter, or Spring terms
   or COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)

Winter

CH 122. *General Chemistry (5)
MTH (4) Need math levels through MTH 111 (College Algebra) 
   or WR 121. *English Composition (3)
   or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical Discourse (3)
ANS Industries (3)
**Bacc Core (3)

Spring

CH 123. *General Chemistry (5)
HHS 231. *Lifetime Fitness for Health (2)
WR 121. *English Composition (3)
   or COMM (3)
**Bacc Core (3)
Electives (3)

Year 2


Fall

BI 211. *Principles of Biology (4)
ANS Industries (3)
Ag. Courses (3)
Electives (3)
WR II (3)

Winter

ANS 251. Principles of Animal Foods Technology (3)
BI 212. *Principles of Biology (4)
ANS Industries (3)
**Bacc Core (3)
Electives (3)

Spring

ANS 207. Sophomore Seminar (2)
BI 213. *Principles of Biology (4)
HHS 241. *Lifetime Fitness (1)
   or PAC (1)
Business Course (3–4)
**Bacc Core (3)
Electives (3)

Year 3


Fall

ANS 311. Principles of Animal Nutrition (3)
ANS 378. Animal Genetics (4)
CH 331. Organic Chemistry (4) and CH 130. General Chemistry of Living Systems (4)
   or BB 331. *Introduction to Molecular Biology (3)
ST 351. Introduction to Statistical Methods (4)

Winter

ANS 313. Applied Animal Nutrition: Feeds and Ration Formulation (4)
ANS 314. Animal Physiology (4)
ANS Production (3–4)
Bacc Core: Synthesis Area Course (3)

Spring

Ag. Credits (3–6)
Upper-Division ANS (3–4)
Electives
   or ANS Production (3–4)
**Bacc Core (3)

Year 4


Fall

ANS 420. Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture (3) Taken either Fall, Winter, or Spring term of the senior year.
Upper-Division ANS (3–4)
ANS Production (3–4)
Other Ag (3)
Electives (3)

Winter

Ag. Courses (3)
ANS 420. Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture (3) Taken either Fall, Winter, or Spring term of the senior year.
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
Bacc Core: Synthesis Area Course (3)
Electives (3–6)

Spring

ANS 316. Reproduction in Domestic Animals (4)
ANS 317. Reproduction in Domestic Animals Laboratory (1)
ANS 420. Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture (3) Taken either Fall, Winter, or Spring term of the senior year.
Ag. Courses (3–6)
Electives (3–6)

Total=180

Students need a total of 180 credits (60 must be upper division (300–400 level) to graduate from Oregon State University.


Footnotes:

** Bacc Core = Western Culture, Cultural Diversity, Literature & Arts, Social Processes and Institutions, or Difference Power and Discrimination.

 

 



Major Code: 125

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